Feeds:
Posts
Comments

Posts Tagged ‘#Fine Arts #The Study of Art #Color and Luminescence’

Somewhere between the art of tonalism and luminism is a painting of all the colors seen on the horizon at the moment of sunrise. It depicts the time when a night-darkened horizon line breaks loose from the underground with bright light. Colors go from soft grey to white streams of light that allow colors to jettison through the atmosphere, bouncing onto the grounds and waters below.

It is a moment of rainbow color craziness, lasting only a few seconds before the plain morning light breaks, leaving the simpler blues and yellows of breakfast sunshine.

An en plein air painter might have 10 seconds to observe the shifting array of sunrise colors.

Photography and painting alter it, limited by the technology, techniques and mechanisms used to depict it.

I call this painting, Alone Together.

These sketches were completed during the period of time that I have been taking the art class called Painting on the Edge taught by Michael Orwick, offered through the Oregon Society of Artists.

Alone Together, oil painting

Read Full Post »

These sketches are notes prepared for planning a future painting.  In the process, I  play with brush marks and edges on cardboard, first in black and white and then adding some more abstract color perspectives. 

I am thinking about a simple painting of a person and a bird on an ocean beach, and am wondering what direction to take. 

Where should the person and the bird be positioned?  Should their lines be hard edged and realistic or might these objects be better depicted in a more  abstract and reflective way?  Should they stand out and burst with color or be more tonal in nature, positioning themselves smoothly between water, sky and beach?  When and where should the sky, and the water erupt into being?  How does light run through this?

These sketches on cardboard are for me, a form of meditation.

They are a kind of warm up where I roam about the gessoed cardboard with ink, some acrylic and finally oils, while playing with shapes and soft edges, varying the texture to see what affect it has on the person and the bird.

Person and Bird, Acrylic on cardboard

How important is this bird?

Water Bird, acrylic on cardboard

What about reflections, and of what?

Water bird with reflection I, acrylic on cardboard

Playing with water reflections and edges.

Water Bird with Reflection II, more abstract, acrylic on cardboard

Let’s try mixing it up a little, who has the sharp edges and who is soft and fuzzy?

Sketches for future painting called Alone Together, acrylic on cardboard

A person and bird on an ocean beach, with greater emphasis on the bird.

How complex should the textures be when sketching the bird and person? How about varying brush strokes and types of edges and how these variations create differential emphases on the sky, beach and ocean? How much color should I add?

There are five parts to this simple painting: bird, person, waves, beach, sky, However, this bird seems to be taking over.

Person and Water Bird, (oil paint on cardboard)

Shifting to color when thinking about the horizon and light, I paint some potential perspectives on the background.

Abstract I, Oils on cardboard, hard horizon
Abstract II, oil paint on cardboard, soft horizon

How to depict with horizontal lines, those beautiful shifts in color, the blended statuses that occur, between sky and the imagined ocean horizon; repeated when ocean waves become still waters and beach sand?

Abstract III Oil Painting on Cardboard

And how would it look if it all turned out in blues?

Abstract IV, oil paint on cardboard, lines upon lines

These are early thoughts about edges and brushwork that I might use while preparing a future oil painting of a person and a bird, positioned on the soft and often merged horizontal lines between water, beach and sky.

Time will tell how this all turns out.

These sketches were completed during the period of time that I have been taking the art class called Painting on the Edge taught by Michael Orwick, offered through the Oregon Society of Artists.

Read Full Post »

The whole reason for taking an art course it to break into new territory, and that is what I am doing. Since the beginning of this year, I have been following the courses taught by Michael Orwick through the Oregon Society of Artists. Knowing what kind of teacher he is, I decided to carry several pieces of work through his entire set of courses to see what I might learn about each aspect of art that he teaches. The first course he taught focused on The Value of Design. The second course, that I am now taking focuses on Creative Color and Luminescence.

After several weeks of reading, painting, thinking about color, and trying various ways of approaching this painting, I feel that my painting of a Winter Bridge is now reaching a point that the painting shows new growth and development on a color perspective. I appreciate the commentary and critique of our instructor, Michael Orwick, and the many talented art students who have offered observations and suggestions about directions to take.

Michael Orwick’s course is three hours per weekly session for six weeks and on Zoom, leaving us all deep in thought and happily tired from all the thinking and planning that we do during these intensely focused three hour sessions. I look forward to discovering next steps in this art series.

As a suggestion to anyone who decides to take this course, I have found it very helpful to carry several paintings that I want to complete through the entire series and adapting them according to what I learn as I go along. This approach, thus far, has resulted in some adaptive best practices for how to adjust and rearrange my existing art plans to meet current needs.

Read Full Post »

« Newer Posts